Tuesday, May 19, 2015

Part 6 of Free Acting School - Do you need some acting tips to help you prepare for your performance?

You will now memorize and practice your two monologues.  Here are some tips on preparing.

After you practice and memorize the monologue, you can act it for friends or family or video yourself doing it and watch it on your own for ideas to improve. If a part is boring or hard to watch, then think of ways to make that part more interesting. Do the monologue over until you feel like you'd be proud to show someone else. When you do show your video monologue to someone else (or even a small group of family and friends), watch how they react rather than watching the video with them. Are there parts that they have good reactions to? Make a note of the good parts and then think of ways to improve the other parts.

Question from new actor 1: Do actors feel emotions when they act or just pretend? For example, if they are meant to appear sad and possibly cry, do they internally make themselves sad like their character (by pretending to be that character) or do they just fake what it is supposed to look like?

Answer: There are two different types of actors: method and technical. Technical have techniques for showing emotions but don't really feel them. Method actors actually feel the part and become the character in their own minds. Method actors do some amazing performances but can be overwhelmed by the parts (i. e. Heath Ledger). Technical actors can be good and popular as well (i. e. Harrison Ford) but they often seem like they are always the same person in many roles.

Question from new actor 2: "How to work on facial expression for acting? i cant convey my emotions when i act. do you have any tips and examples for each emotions like sad, frightened, nervous, etc. is squinting a bad thing. how do i move my eyebrows downward"

Answer: Rather than trying to create the emotions on your face, work on feeling the emotions. Pick something that makes you feel a certain way (scared) and try to really feel that way.

Here is a great monologue with a variety of emotions: http://freedramaplays.blogspot.com/2014/12/advice-on-performing-monologue-breaking.html

Try to think of times in your own life where you have felt like the character and then remember these emotions while doing the monologue. Record yourself and forget about the camera while you do it. Focus on the emotions and really feeling them.

Question from new actor 3: Any tips on voice enunciation because I sound the same throughout the recording?

Answer: First, when you go through a script, think of different emotions the character might be feeling.

In this monologue: http://freedrama.net/protecto.html At first he is excited, then in the middle he is sad or worried. Then he starts to get excited again, but then at the end he is confused and disappointed. You'd want to reflect that in your voice and acting. Show each of those emotions for each part.

Next, look at each sentence. Pick out a word or two in each sentence that you'd want to put the most emphasis on. In the line "I've always dreamed of being a hero." You might pick "dreamed" or "hero" or both to the be the words you say a little more clearly or forcefully.

Memorizing lines:
A quick way to learn lines is to record all the lines and play them back and say them along with the recording. You can record with your computer, phone, etc. Play it over and over and say your lines along with the recording. Then when you know it better, pause the recording after each line and try to say your line. Listen to the line and see if you got it right and try again.

Other ways that people learn lines include reading the script and covering your lines up. Read the line before and then try to say your line while it is covered up. Another common way is to have someone read the cue lines and you try to say them. I have even seen people type all their lines as a way to memorize. Look at the previous line and then try typing your next line without looking at the script. Everyone memorizes differently so it is good to try different techniques to see what works best.

YOUR ASSIGNMENT: Post what tips worked the best for preparing your monologue and any questions you have.

You must then respond to another actor in this discussion.  Give words of encouragement. Share your experiences. Or discuss acting.  Your interactions MUST be positive or you will be disqualified from taking the class and you will NOT be considered for a paid position as an online monologue performer for Freedrama.

***
On to part 7 - http://freedramaplays.blogspot.com/2015/05/part-7-of-free-acting-school-record.html

Back to Part 1 - http://freedramaplays.blogspot.com/2015/05/free-acting-school-for-2015-part-1.html

Free Acting School - Do you need some acting tips to help you prepare for your performance?

65 comments:

  1. First of all I cut my monologue in parts and connected them with different feelings (fury,sadness,sarcasm etc). So,when I was forgetting my lines,I knew what feeling was next and it helped me remember! I was also hiding each sentence and tried to remember it and when I finally was sure I remembered it, I had my brother reading the monologue and correcting me as I was performing,because it is easier thinking about the lines in your head than saying them out loud. Currently, I am just re-reading them to make sure I know them perfectly, so that struggling to remember won't distract me from embracing my character's feelings.

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    1. That's a great idea. I really like the idea of using emotions and the emotional shifts as a way to help you remember the monologue. Well done!

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    2. This is an absolutely brilliant idea! Great tip and strategy! I will definitely be keeping this in mind! :)

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    3. That is a brilliant idea, taking your scripts in parts:)

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    4. Great ideas I will remember to try that when I start working on memorizing the line to my 2 monologues!:-)

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    5. Thats a great idea im so going to try it.

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    6. That is a good idea to take your scripts apart.

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    7. I like your technique! I did sorta the same thing.

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    8. Very wise! I too see that it helps. I just started practicing my lines and already know half of it.
      You are right.

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    10. I did the same thing, I think this is really helpful and analyzing character helps, which you're pretty amazing at :)

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  2. I chose the two monologues that I related to the best. ( I emailed them to you).
    The lines sort of came natural as I have been there before. There were A few lines that I felt I stumbled over, I needed to grasp the feeling that person in the script may have been feeling. I did this by Channel similar events that I have experienced. In the not so perfect child she was at first angry. but towards the end she was caught between angry and hurt. In tearing me apart, she had a sense of wonder, and curiosity. Channeling energy is my strategy for bringing the character to life.

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  3. what helped me was memorizing , I kind of had trouble until I had yall help! and I like the one I chose because i act like the character and puts my emotions and physical reactions into the story although im not the character but somewhere in the story that's me .

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    1. Yes, memorising makes it all the more easier and it is essential for the actor to know his/her lines unless you're allowed to do improv.

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  4. I try to find as many similarities as I can, between the role I'm playing and my own character and then, I just live my regular life but I attempt to express or display these similarities more throughout the day. I downplay the differences while making the similarities between me and my role outstanding. This makes it easier for me to live my role as I get to be myself! I love trying out different accents too and I just try to perform the monologue in all kinds of dialects or accents. It helps me to speak clearly as well as I have my accent that is a weird mix of a few accents and it is pretty strong. So, I pick out the most suitable accent I could use for the role and I try to perform it in that accent. :)

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    1. "I try to find as many similarities as I can, between the role I'm playing and my own character"

      "This makes it easier for me to live my role as I get to be myself!"

      I like your technique and have heard other friends tell me they do this very same thing.

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    2. Great advice! I should use this :D

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  5. While I was practicing my monologues, I split it up into parts. So I just learn part by part.

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    1. Yes, that always helps me to learn my lines! Great tactic!

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  6. In my experience, I have had a hard time doing lines along the emotions. I've noticed this with other actors in my classes. They lose the lines while trying to bring out the character.

    What I did was write out the monologue. I look for the beat in the monologue and separate as such. What I did was write one section on a pad over and over and said the lines out loud. I test myself by walking away then coming back and with out looking trying to remember the lines I just tried to memorize. I should know my lines backwards and forwards.

    Depending on the length of monologue this could take me days.

    Then comes the second part. I then do my character study and the emotions I need to draw on. I find where the emotions belong and practice drawing on those emotions with the lines. I may spend days or a week just practicing that.

    I find it difficult to match character, emotions and lines all together and take the time to combine all to finally complete a believable character.

    I did an audition for a character and got the role just recently because I asked to have 5 days to spend on the side. The casting director agreed. When I did my audition I closed my eye's and waited to draw on the emotion and character. I then opened my eye's and gave the audition. Even If I didn't get the role. I used that audition to practice and enjoyed it. I think of auditions as a chance to practice and sharpen my skills.

    Some times we win, some times we learn. That is how I do my auditions.

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    1. Wow its like life how you explained it we learn from our mistakes

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  7. The recording my lines and rehearsing helped
    So thanks for the tip

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  8. For the emotions I used personal experiences that made me feel a certain way... Then I've watched many clips from many movies that helped me out with emotion part. As for memorizing I found it quite easy... I was reading and covering my lines up. It was really cool!!!

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    1. Personal experience helps. When you can connect with the monologue in a personal experience the emotions are natural as you go back to the way that you felt during that similar situation. I agree and also used personal experience!

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  9. Well the way i learned my monologues was just reading them over and over. First just reading the lines. Then i continued continued read the lines over but this time with emotions. I try and imagine where iI am what am I doing as that helps me to remember the lines. I become the e character. That really helps me to remember the lines.

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  10. I read them over and then once ive got it I try it on the camera and if forget it then I just keep reading it till I get it completely down pat then I redo the video and make sure I make no mistakes in what I do.

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  11. I first went over my lines in my head so I could picture what I would do and try to think about what the character would be feeling, then I split the emotions up into different groups and recorded me saying each line in that emotion to see if that seemed like a good emotion for that line (saying it out loud). Once I adjusted each line to an emotion I memorized each 1-2 paragraphs then recorded myself saying each one..soon enough I got all of the lines stuck in my head and I could record myself saying each one with no mess ups! When I showed it to some of my friends they gave me some of their feedback and I adjusted each one and came up with a GREAT video!

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  12. I am a method actor. And the mesmerizing lines helped me thanks.Savannah I'm gonna try that

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  13. The best way for me to memorize the monologues was to record myself several times doing it…picking the one that seemed to me the best way to portray the character and then listen to it over and over and over. That is the same way that I memorize music. Repetitive always seems the best way to remember. Then once memorized portraying the character seems to come natural because you know the words that the character is saying.

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    1. Your methods are solid, I have tried a few of these and they've been highly successful for me. Good job, hope to see more from you in the near future.

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    2. That is a great way to go about memorizing!

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  14. I usted to perform in church plays and school plays, so I tried what always worked for me best and it worked. I broke my lines up in smaller parts and did repetitive enunciation, I did gain some valuable tips from some of y'all though. I recorded myself saying my lines then listened to how I sounded while I read the line in print so that it was kind of like listening to an audio book and reading the book simultaneously. This helped tremendously. I also took small study breaks,made sure not to cram too much.

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  15. I wrote out my monologues and highlighted the different emotions, each colour corresponding with an emotion i.e red-anger, blue-sadness, green-neutral, yellow-happiness. Then I read it out loud focusing on the different emotions and then I re-read them looking back and forth at the monologue testing myself.

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  16. Recording my monologue and saying it along with the recording helped. I also cut it into sections and tried to figure out the emotions my character was feeling.

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    1. I took and did the same thing which I think really helps its just like watching a movie you like and remember the movie word for word.

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  17. When I work on memorizing my lines I read them out loud, then try and say them with out looking. Then I check back to see if I was right or not, if I was wrong by a word or two then I repeat that pert while reading it but forcefully say or emphasis the words that I got wrong. If I can, I find it also helps to watch other people's performances of something that I am trying to learn, then I can build off of the way they performed the same lines and change them so they are more suited to how I am portraying a character.

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    1. I've done that before and it worked really well. Those are very good tips.

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  18. I remembered my lines by recording my self saying the lines then once being remembered I added emotion picking out 2words to really add emphasis on really helped big time.

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  19. Think about the story and add your own touching points. It will be okay if you change a couple little things if it adds to how emotionally you say it.

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    1. Yeah i guess you dont have to be exact to the script, can add abit of your own personality to it

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    2. Only remembering the main points and adding the rest.

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  20. For me, as i try to memorize the script, i put variations in my voice (not easy as it sounds exactly the same) so i try to be louder and more pronounced in some individual words that i emphasize more. I just keep reading over and imagining the emotions that the character is going through as he/she is saying those lines. Imagine who they are talking to, every aspect of who and where they are giving their speeches to. And i keep imagining it at night as well the stages and how they look like, their actions when they talk.

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    1. I like your approach. Very similar to mine!

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  21. I chose the monologues I related to because I feel I am a method actor. I chose ones that I knew I could perform the best I can. What also worked for me was your help on conveying facial expressions because it made performing my monologues that much better. As well as memorizing the script and identifying what the characters emotions should be.

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    1. It is easy to do the character with whom you can relate to because then it is easy to understand what the character is going through and why he is saying what he is saying. Good luck.

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  22. Tips that helped me preparing: In connecting with the emotion of the character. I AM the character. I must understand why the I am saying what I am saying. I imagine myself in that scenario and how I would feel. Then connecting with the emotion isn't so hard, because it's my emotion being created in that moment.

    A quick way to learn lines is to record all the lines and play them back and say them along with the recording. You can record with your computer, phone, etc. Play it over and over and say your lines along with the recording. Then when you know it better, pause the recording after each line and try to say your line. Listen to the line and see if you got it right and try again.

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  23. I try to figure out the whole situation behind the scenes, what is the situation, how the character must be feeling at that time. Why is he saying all these things. After that I rehease and try to memorize the dialogues by first recording and then playing them back.

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  24. I recorded a video of my monologue, and I showed it to my family and couple friends, and I looked at their facial expressions, and when I saw a negative reaction I would make a note, and write out when I saw it, and re played the video for myself and looked at the part where the person reacted negatively, and I thought about ways to better myself, and showed it to the same group of people, and they told me "I like how you changed that part, I wasn't feeling it in the beginning, but now I really like it, and I think you did very well, good job!". For memorization I broke up the monologues and I wrote down the monologues 8 times in about 20 - 25 minutes and I memorized it, then I worked on it and bettering the facial expressions and everything for about an hour just perfecting it, then I spent about 20 minutes making the monologue video.

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    1. This is very good. Especially since your audience is the most important aspect of your performance. You memorization method is also very nice. It seems to work for a lot of people. It was the first way I learned.

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  25. What helped me was also splitting my monologues into different sections and knowing which emotions come next. Also helps to continue to practice over and over record it say it while reading it and just memorize it.

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  26. I like all the tips, there very encouraging and inspirational. It help you to over come your desires. It builds up your courage to act. It helps with practicing. These tips are very useful and strong. It comes to my attention that these tips are for non believers as well as believers. Tips are for your needs, they combine different techniques for beginners and advance actors. It can also separate you from the rest. It takes patience to achieve the actors hard work ability to achieve whats giving to you. As an actor the first thing is to work work work. you have to define self in every way. The choice is yours. Each actor has a commitment. he or she must commit to being the star they are. Actors or actress must obey and follow all regulations beyond the debts of the film industry. We shall not take for granted but to win fame. We as actors must commit to doing our best and go willing to perfect that audition.

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  27. I pretended I was the character. I went through the actions, the facial expressions and the emotions. I also recorded myself and found room for improvement. I circled the areas were I needed to be louder, quieter, etc.

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    1. This is good. Especially where you record yourself to critique yourself.

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  28. I found that recording it on my phone and writing down is helpful. I also reread it.

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    1. Ah I forgot to say that! Writing it down from memory really helped me too!

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  29. AS far as memorization, I have always found it most helpful to start off by doing a few cold reads to myself & recording the last one. Then I re write the entire thing. After that I listen to the recording and just go through it before saiying in front of a mirror a few times. Speaking in front of a mirror also helps me with conveying emotions, as well as recalling times in my own life. I have always been more of a method actor. I can be technical, but it always feels robotic (when I do it), and I like the flow of method acting better. I have always felt that an actor should become the character, not just pretend to be them. It's also a better strategy for the stage, which is my preference.

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  30. First I analyzed a character from monologue (I also read a play, which helped a lot with analyzing character, of course), trying to figure out what he is like, what's like his personality and basically I tried to understand the character as much as I can, so I could imagine I am that character and that way when something happens to the character I'll feel the real emotion that character does and every time I'll move differently and that way I won't be boring, at least I hope. Than I cut the monologue in pieces and I tried to see what emotion belongs to certain piece. Than I underline words in every line that I think are important for certain line and certain emotion in the line so I'll try to say these words more clearly. Then I recorded whole monologue and I listen to it with text in front of me, then when I think I know monologue good enough, I'll try to listen to it without text in front of me, then when I think I know whole monologue good enough I'll record video of me acting and I'll keep doing that until I'm satisfied with result and then I'll go to another monologue. And also while I'm learning the monologue I'm matching the emotions with lines and also I'm imagining the situation for every line, so if I forget a line I'll remember the situation or emotion and I'll remember the line.

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    1. I forgot to ask a question so here it is: I feel like I'm rushing and I try to do some pauses, but still I feel I'm rushing, so do you have any tips on how to control diction?

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  31. As far as memorizing goes, I would go on walks and bring a printed copy of the monologue with me and try to recite as much as I could without looking and keep adding a few words or one more sentence. Then I would go back to the beginning and do it over and over again. I also would read it and do the same kind of thing in my head while doing another activity.

    Something else that worked is trying to not worry about what it sounds like. When you say it, feel it and believe it. Also, asking for feedback from others also calls attention to detail you may not be able to pick out!

    The biggest question I would have is how to really get rid of your perception of what it sounds like or looks like. While I'm saying it, I'm too concerned about what it may come out as, no matter how hard I try.

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