Friday, January 1, 2016

Part 8 Free Acting School - Freedrama Online Class for Actors - 2016 Edition

You will now memorize and practice your two monologues.  Here are some tips on preparing.

After you practice and memorize the monologue, you can act it for friends or family or video yourself doing it and watch it on your own for ideas to improve. If a part is boring or hard to watch, then think of ways to make that part more interesting. Do the monologue over until you feel like you'd be proud to show someone else. When you do show your video monologue to someone else (or even a small group of family and friends), watch how they react rather than watching the video with them. Are there parts that they have good reactions to? Make a note of the good parts and then think of ways to improve the other parts.

Question from new actor 1: Do actors feel emotions when they act or just pretend? For example, if they are meant to appear sad and possibly cry, do they internally make themselves sad like their character (by pretending to be that character) or do they just fake what it is supposed to look like?

Answer: There are two different types of actors: method and technical. Technical have techniques for showing emotions but don't really feel them. Method actors actually feel the part and become the character in their own minds. Method actors do some amazing performances but can be overwhelmed by the parts (i. e. Heath Ledger). Technical actors can be good and popular as well (i. e. Harrison Ford) but they often seem like they are always the same person in many roles.

Question from new actor 2: "How to work on facial expression for acting? i cant convey my emotions when i act. do you have any tips and examples for each emotions like sad, frightened, nervous, etc. is squinting a bad thing. how do i move my eyebrows downward"

Answer: Rather than trying to create the emotions on your face, work on feeling the emotions. Pick something that makes you feel a certain way (scared) and try to really feel that way.

Here is a great monologue with a variety of emotions: http://freedramaplays.blogspot.com/2014/12/advice-on-performing-monologue-breaking.html

Try to think of times in your own life where you have felt like the character and then remember these emotions while doing the monologue. Record yourself and forget about the camera while you do it. Focus on the emotions and really feeling them.

Question from new actor 3: Any tips on voice enunciation because I sound the same throughout the recording?

Answer: First, when you go through a script, think of different emotions the character might be feeling.

In this monologue: http://freedrama.net/protecto.html At first he is excited, then in the middle he is sad or worried. Then he starts to get excited again, but then at the end he is confused and disappointed. You'd want to reflect that in your voice and acting. Show each of those emotions for each part.

Next, look at each sentence. Pick out a word or two in each sentence that you'd want to put the most emphasis on. In the line "I've always dreamed of being a hero." You might pick "dreamed" or "hero" or both to the be the words you say a little more clearly or forcefully.

Memorizing lines:
A quick way to learn lines is to record all the lines and play them back and say them along with the recording. You can record with your computer, phone, etc. Play it over and over and say your lines along with the recording. Then when you know it better, pause the recording after each line and try to say your line. Listen to the line and see if you got it right and try again.

Other ways that people learn lines include reading the script and covering your lines up. Read the line before and then try to say your line while it is covered up. Another common way is to have someone read the cue lines and you try to say them. I have even seen people type all their lines as a way to memorize. Look at the previous line and then try typing your next line without looking at the script. Everyone memorizes differently so it is good to try different techniques to see what works best.

YOUR ASSIGNMENT: Post what tips worked the best for preparing your monologue and any questions you have.

You must then respond to another actor in this discussion.  Give words of encouragement. Share your experiences. Or discuss acting.  Your interactions MUST be positive or you will be disqualified from taking the class and you will NOT be considered for a paid position as an online monologue performer for Freedrama.

***
On to part 9: http://freedramaplays.blogspot.com/2016/01/part-9-free-acting-school-freedrama.html

Back to Part 1: http://freedramaplays.blogspot.com/2016/01/part-1-free-acting-school-from.html

Free Acting School - Do you need some acting tips to help you prepare for your performance?

59 comments:

  1. I felt recording myself rehearsing my lines gave me some good feedback because it showed me the areas I need to work on, and I could repeat it several times. If you are unable to do that, you could rehearse in front of a mirror, to see your facial expressions and adjust them if needed.

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    1. Rehearsaing in front of the mirror is good tip, thanks

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    2. I agree Jess, I like to practice in front of a mirror so that I can see what my face looks like while I'm acting and make sure that I'm expressing my emotions through my eyes- I feel like that's so important!

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    3. The tip that worked the best for me is to really feel what the character is feeling and pretend like you are then because I feel like it is more authentic and real that way and it definitely shows!
      Annie Rohan

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    4. In remebering my lines for rehearsal, I have to connect with the character. It maybe hard because I'm lying and pretending the emotions. But I will empanize the character. So technical acting will work for me. However, methoding I will simpanizes and empanizes my character's story with more emotion. I use the audio recorder to hear the emotion in my voice to know character experience. Live the lies with character as I lie. Tanika Garner aka Zoe T. Garner

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    5. I totally agree. One of the most helpful things was recording myself and I did go in the mirror multiple times and rehearse.

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    6. That's what I do as well and it works totally

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    7. It worked for me to so every one lets keep doing our best! :-)

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  2. The tips that helped me was listening to a recording of myself, and watching a recording of myself and watched my facial expressions.

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  3. the tip that worked the best for me was the feel not just show what your acting. Also recording myself and watching it to critic it really helped too

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    1. Yes! I totally agree, recording yourself to critique is very helpful! And it helps to show others and see their reactions. And truly feeling the emotions instead of just acting them out will definitely bring out a more meaningful character.

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  4. I find that printing out my script and reading, and speaking the lines is the best way for me to memorize them. It helps me read out the emotions for each line as well. And method acting always plays more real to me. Find similarities between the character and yourself, finding yourself in the character. Having friends and family watch the video after I record myself I believe will be very helpful, read their reactions and see what needs to be changed.

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    1. It worked for me andI am going to have friends and family help too when i record my videos.

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    2. In finding words, I could know lives to live with character moods. I believe you know to lie and live in a character lives. Change the lie to pretending and live honest as the character.

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  5. For me, writing the script down, separating it into chunks, and repeating it time after time worked out. I also use this strategy for learning songs, and its pretty great.

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  6. I felt recording myself rehearsing my lines gave me some good feedback because it showed me the areas I need to work on, and I could repeat it several times. If you are unable to do that, you could rehearse in front of a mirror, to see your facial expressions and adjust them if needed. I gave it my best and kept learning the lins.

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    1. This is good it's like what I did recording my monologues over and over seeing what I could improve or liked from it, and yes being able to see yourself is good you can see if you are being in character or if your expressions or actions are suiting the words you are saying.

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  7. I feel that you must constantly practice to improve your skills.

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    1. I strongly agree with you. Practice, practice, practice. I find myself repeating it in my head all the time.

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  8. Rehearsing is the most helpful advice for me because doing the monologue over and over again sort of made it feel more comfortable. As much as I could I try to memorize the lines but I also try to understand the thought first so that when I forget I line I can still continue with the monologue.

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    1. I totally agree. it helps you get the feel for the script.

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    2. When I lie, I live lying. I listen to the lies and I listen to the live in the character. I love living in the character. Tanika Garner aka Zoe T. Garner

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  9. I feel like covering up the lines was a useful method to memorizing the lines along with recording it.

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    1. I really like recording the lines. I play my recording every chance I get! I feel like it's like learning a new song. Put it on repeat until you have it down!

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  10. i break the lines down into sentences remembering those, they just key word then nothing .

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    1. That was also one of the things wich really helped me

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  11. I see myself as being more of a method actor (at least to start out). I have to pull a memory from my mind and relive it in order to get the necessary emotion for a scene/monologue. I hopefully will be able to become more of a technical actor as I grow and learn. As for facial expression, I like to look at myself in the mirror as I read my lines and focus on what I look like. I also have a “list” of facial expressions that I use, based on different characters from some of my favorite movies and shows. When it comes to memorizing my lines, I like to do a combination of two different things. I love the method of recording myself reading the lines and playing it over and over again. I am also fluent in Sign Language, so I will sign my lines over and over again. It almost becomes a dance that I can memorize. So if I forget where I am in a script and don’t have the lines in front of me, I can sign what I just said and remember the next part of the “dance.”

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    1. Ah yes, method acting is quite good, though I'd say both together is the ideal situation. Anyway it's good that you are learning from experienced actors to improve your cract, that's a very good strategy. I have heard discussions that looking yourself in the mirror isn't a positive thing, however evne they admitted that it was a gray area. The argument is that when you see yourself in the mirror, you see yourself and not the character, to method act, you have to BECOME the character, not be yourself acting as the character. But yeah, it's good that you relate your actions to dance because that's key in keeping continuity. You seem to be a pretty well together actor and here's to hoping we both can make it in this hectic field.

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  12. Despite the fact that I was aware of all of the techniques listed, I would say method vs technical is the thing that I take the most use of when acting. I am of the belief that you need both to be a successful actor. You need to make yourself be the character and to make yourself feel the emotions even though you're trained the lines so hard that you're bored of them. You also need to hang on the words that are being said in the scene as well. On a technical level, you need to have everything down so perfectly while doing film acting that you know exactly what you do at every moment both in how you recite lines, but also in how you move your body. You need to keep continuity at such a level that it's a bit outrageous, being able to remember scenes you did weeks ago so that the close up matches up with the master shot and the master shot matches up with the mid shot. You have to do this even if you are doing scenes in random order and doing different shots of the same scene weeks apart from each other. Honestly falling into character is the thing that made me fall in love with acting, both for becoming a new person and being so vulnerable in doing so.

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  13. While trying to memorize the monologues, I find that recording myself reading it and playing it over and over again really helps. I also would try to type it out in a word document from memory and compare the two together. However, I need to work on trying to slow myself down. I try to speak too fast and it makes me mess up too much. I will admit that, at this point, I only have the one memorized so far. I'm trying to perfect it before I move to the hard one. I always felt I would fall flat on the memorization part. But I am very proud of my progress so far.

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    1. Minnie,

      I hope you manage to slow yourself down, you sound like you having things under control. goodluck.

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  14. I felt that the best tip that helped me was to record myself. I could see my facial expression and it was way easier than practicing it infront of a mirror

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  15. The way I learned my lines was to first record the full monologue reading the lines, and then to write them out over and over until I was eventually writing it without having to check, or to check that I was right, then when I was confident with them I said them without looking along with the first recording I did to see if IT was word for word I found this way quite easy. As for preparing for the video to what I would do or how I would say things, I recorded myself a few times and picked out certain things from them that I liked best or thought worked best and put it into one. It helped knowing how to say things by reading the plays, understanding the characters how they are feeling and why they are saying what they did helps me to feel it.

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  16. The way for is to have the script in hand while repeating each sentence over and over really fast. For me this helps in letting the words sink in. I would definitely recommend recording yourself doing the monologues. It helps SO MUCH to see what you're doing.It will be strange at first but you will get use to it.

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  17. What tips worked the best for preparing your monologues and any questions you have?

    • Learning and understanding all about the character.
    • .Writing the monologue down and rewriting it from memory.
    • .Practicing in front of the mirror is also helpful.
    • .Recording the monologue also helped.

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    1. I didn't think about how learning and understanding the character is a very important step in memorizing the lines. Thanks, Blessmore for reminding me of that.

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  18. the best thing to prepare for a monologue is...
    - writing it down on paper.
    - practicing in front of a mirror.
    - practicing it by recording it first.

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  19. Memorizing lines:
    A quick way to learn lines is to record all the lines and play them back and say them along with the recording. You can record with your computer, phone, etc. Play it over and over and say your lines along with the recording. Then when you know it better, pause the recording after each line and try to say your line. Listen to the line and see if you got it right and try again.


    This tip helped me in fact I used it to remember my lines!

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    1. Essentially what I did :) Great tip, thanks :L

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  20. A few tips that i use to practice and memorize lines are first I write the monologue twice. Once I do that, hen I go back and read the monologue aloud until I can predict the next line or words. The next tip I use in practicing my lines is using different symbols on those rewrites. If I want to show an emphasis on a particular word I ___ it. If I want to show the speed on how I say a word I.use .dots .in .between the words. The third symbol I use is a /. It shows where I will take a breath at. These are the most effective to me and I hope you will find them useful as well.

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  21. I recorded my monologue perfectly then fell asleep listening to it. I have a minute short term memory loss so I still had to check the lines in my vid sadly :( however I am improving :)

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    1. Hey, that's a creative an interesting way to learn. Don't let obstacles get in your way. I'm sure that if you want it, you can make it happen.

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  22. The best way I can memorize a script (or any written information for that matter) is to challenge myself to recall it. I like efficient things, so the quickest way I can memorize things is to cover the words and recite them, then check to see if I got it right. If I messed up a bit, i just repeat the thing that I messed up on. I repeat the phrase where I made a mistake several times until that phrase is the one I remember best, then I start from the top and do it over again. One thing that takes more time to set up, but helps me memorize even faster, is to listen to the lines being said. So, if I wanted to record myself and then listen to the recording and then try to repeat the recording, that could also be a very fast way to learn. I'm not sure if taking the time to record the lines makes for a faster learning schedule, but it does help me get it down fast. In any case, the slowest way for me to memorize anything is to just have the information given to me (by reading it or listening to it without challenging myself to recall it). Feeding myself information without attempting to recall it seems to actually hinder me from learning. So, if my opinion counts for anything, I'd say that no matter what approach you use, try to recall he lines to the best of your ability before looking at the script or listening to your recording. I think you'll learn faster if you try to recall things rather than simply reading or listening to it.

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  23. Tip:
    Try and record yourself rehearsing the lines without the script meaning to video it.
    If it is hard memorizing anything your doing try to talk the lines whenever you go along to what you doing. You can also put in you own words to keep you on track.

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  24. Did a bit of research and found the "Mind Palace" - technique. Ive already started doing a complete mapping of my mothers house that has more than ten rooms. Im going to use these rooms from now on and in future projects. The way this technique works is quite simple, if you want the details, check out youtube clips on the matter!

    What remains for me noe is to keep using my mind palace.

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  25. What worked best for me was imagining the scenario so that I can feel like the character felt
    Draw on past emotions to create the emotions needed
    Use imagination combined with the facts to make a truthful performance

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    1. Using imagination with inspiration gives a new meaning to success in the tips you used, I believe this along with the tip recording lines are the key to a huge audience with their hands clapping together. Wish you the best of luck.

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  26. What worked for me is already part of the tips, I record my lines, and say it along with it, this same tool helps music artist to play their lines in concerts as well. However, as a scene, I found adding two tools together worked really well like imagining the scene and the person I felt I was speaking to in the line, two stones will overkill 1 performance in my eyes.

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    1. Recording lines sounds like a good idea. I haven't tried it before but I think I'm going to!

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  27. My favourite way to prepare for monologues is: 1. Write the lines down on paper. 2. Break the lines up into sections, breaking every time a different emotion is needed or if the character is pausing. 3. Practise one section until it's memorised. (Usually a few sentences). Next, move on to the next section. Once that's memorised, say the two sections together. Continue until the whole monologue is memorised. It also helps to practice my lines in front of a mirror.

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  28. i ahve a disability so its not going to be able to memorize my lines

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